Monthly Archives: January 2016

Media Coverage Summary – Jan. 29, 2016

Media Coverage Summary Colleges

The following is a roundup of news on North Dakota University System’s 11 public colleges and universities for the week ending Friday, Jan. 29.

 


Bismarck State College

BSC hosts choir festival and Saturday concert
BSC faculty member publishes papers
Conversations at BSC features Shakespeare’s Richard III
BookTalk at BSC features ‘Matterhorn’
 


Dakota College at Bottineau

Dakota College at Bottineau Launches TRIO Program
 

Dickinson State University
Mind’s Eye Art Gallery at DSU presents Visions of Home PhotographyDr. Dawn Olson to serve as interim Provost/VPAA
USDA Rural Development to present at Strom Center
Strom Center secures over $575,000 in grants for small businesses in 2015
 


Lake Region State College

LRSC’s Wakeford elected to SBHE staff advisor role
Career and Tech Ed Open House Feb. 9
Music Department Gives the Gift of Music
 

Mayville State University
Support the RN to BSN nursing program at MSU on Giving Hearts Day, Thursday, Feb. 11
The MSU Golf Classic … respecting the past, while keeping an eye on the future
MaSU to host area teachers for day of professional development
Million-dollar gift is changing lives
Olson speaks to Business Income Taxation class
 

Minot State University
HUD letter gives support to Minot’s resilience plan
MSU President Applies for UND Job
Community Rocks Concert Next Week
Minot State University, Cankdeska Cikana Community College presidents apply for UND presidency
Minot State president adds his name for president of UND
Minot State President Shirley applies for UND presidency
 

North Dakota State College of Science
NDSCS announces fall President’s Honor List
NDSCS Students Heinz and Mastel nominated for ND Community College Academic All-State Team
 

North Dakota State University
Business, psychology faculty, alumna publish research
Little black dress exhibit featured at NDSU
Tree selections introduced
Memorial service scheduled for longtime faculty member
Emergency management faculty awarded grant to study hurricane evacuation
 

University of North Dakota
UND English professor Michelle Sauer publishes new book on gender and sexuality in medieval times
UND’s Aerobatic Team is an eight-time national champion
UND appoints NASA scientist as NSERC director
Sima Noghanian pushes the cutting edge when it comes to electrical transmitting and receiving components
Jennifer Klemetsrud Puhl, ’00, nominated to 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
He wrote the book
 

Valley City State University
Donors Central to University
Hotline Newsletter
 

Williston State College
Uncork and Unwind at WSC’s President House to Support Children’s Literacy
Mental Health Awareness is Ahead of the Game at WSC
 

North Dakota University System
Committee narrows list of candidates for the UND presidential search

Wakeford elected SBHE Staff Advisor

AndyProfileToneAndy Wakeford, online coordinator/online advisor at Lake Region State College, has been elected as the 2016-2017 State Board of Higher Education Staff Advisor.

He was elected Jan. 25 during the North Dakota State Staff Senate meeting. Wakeford is immediate past president of the LRSC Staff Senate and served as its president from 2013 to 2015.

“I am excited for Andy to serve in this role. He has served his campus well as a staff advocate and leader, while engaging in the important conversations at State Staff Senate,” said Emma Tufte of Valley City State University, current SBHE Staff Advisor.

Wakeford has worked at LRSC since 2002, serving as online coordinator and advisor since 2008. He also has worked in Student Services, serving as enrollment manager and transfer coordinator for the college’s TRiO Student Support Services program. He holds a bachelor’s degree in communications from University of North Dakota and an associate’s degree from LRSC. Wakeford assumes his staff advisor role July 1.

“I take great pride in the work I and others do on behalf of students, faculty and the campus of LRSC. I think I can take that same passion to the SBHE. I want to be a voice of staff, but also the students and faculty we serve and find opportunities to create a more united system to best serve the students and the state of North Dakota,” Wakeford said.

The State Board of Higher Education is the policy-setting and advocacy body for the North Dakota University System and the governing body for North Dakota’s 11 publicly supported colleges and universities. The SBHE also oversees the NDSU Extension Service and Agricultural Research Stations, Northern Crops Institute, State Forest Service and the Upper Great Plans Transportation Institute.

The SBHE is made up of seven citizen members appointed to four-year terms by the governor and one student appointed by the governor to serve a one-year term. The Council of College Faculties selects the board’s non-voting faculty advisor, and the NDUS Staff Senate selects the board’s non-voting staff advisor.

Grant STEMs development

Federal funding allocated through the Department of Public Instruction provides for professional development

An initiative underway between the state’s two educational agencies is aiming to increase professional development opportunities for high school teachers throughout the state.

The Department of Public Instruction and the North Dakota University System institutions are working together to help deliver multiple Math and Science Partnership (MSP) Grants. One such grant, “Implementing Integrative STEM Education in the Classroom,” allows the Great Plains STEM Education Center (GPSEC) at Valley City State University to provide 36 high school teachers with an expanded knowledge base to take back to their respective classrooms.

GPSEC Director Jamie Wirth said a lot of coordination went into creating the workshops. Nearly $300,000 was awarded through DPI from the federal MSP program, and has largely gone to fund professional development including workshop materials, travel costs, paying for the cost of the graduate-level credits, classroom materials and a modest stipend for the teachers enrolled.

“The lesson plan ideas and classroom activity ideas, they’re all based on the idea of giving the teachers every advantage when they go back into their classrooms and instruct their students,” Wirth said. “There’s been a lot of excitement, and I would say that the workshops have been overwhelmingly positive.”

Wirth developed the workshops with his colleague Dr. Gary Ketterling based on workshops they’d been a part of in the past and STEM curriculum they found useful. Based on that information they put together agendas, schedules, activities and a well-rounded experience the teachers have been regarding as totally positive.

“The teachers are excited about the professional development training,” Wirth added. “We’ve made visits to seven of the eight schools to run a Family Engineering Night for kids, their parents, and interested community members. At these nights they can experience engineering design elements. As far as in the classroom – teachers are already starting to implement things in their classrooms and feedback has been highly positive.”

Lauren Sako, a science teacher for Kensal Public Schools, said the professional development she’d been a part of had been extraordinary. Sako, who teaches science to students in grades 5-12, said she’d been informed of the professional development from her superintendent last fall. From that time she was able to gather more information and spread the word at her school to find other interested teachers.

The daylong workshops have been held one Saturday each month since November and will continue through March, with a weeklong STEM course this June. The workshops will offer insight into the engineering design process, and how educators can bring that content into their classrooms. Four STEM disciplines are broken down into the following topics: coding experience; family engineering; using inquiry in the classroom; technology in a bag; the Engineering Design Process; LEGO Robotics; and teachers working with EV3 video. So far, they’ve offered dynamic topics.

“We did spend a good portion of the last workshop working with programming robots and I learned I need a lot more practice,” Sako noted. “We also watched a company go through the engineering process redesigning a shopping cart. I plan on showing at least part of that video to students for them to get a better understanding that there can be many ways to solve a problem, and that there is a fair amount of brainstorming and research that goes into designing a product/the engineering process.”

Sako has already been able to bring some of the knowledge to the classroom.

“With the first workshop, our school chose to sign up for the Hour of Code and have students work on coding as a way to bring STEM into the classroom,” she said. “In addition to that, the elementary classes did a tower building project that students really enjoyed.

“As for my classroom, I have been working on a way to incorporate engineering into the biology curriculum dealing with protein structure and function,” Sako added. “I plan on working through the details of an assignment with students next week and having them give it a try.Sako noted that she was pleasantly surprised with a professional development-inspired family engineering night, which brought many parents into the fold.

“I will say that I was really surprised at our family engineering night – those families who attended stayed the whole two hours working at the projects at each station,” she said. “They were very involved and made it a fun family night of learning.”

She concluded that she would recommend the development to others.

“Any professional development that provides hands-on practice and some usable ideas is invaluable,” Sako said.

Video from the Family Engineering Nights at Edgeley can be seen here.

Wirth added that the teachers enrolled in the workshops have found them to be rewarding, positive and beneficial.

“Our mission at GPSEC is to bring STEM education to the K-12 world,” he said. “Obviously our grant from DPI and participation from eight schools helps make sure that we’re fulfilling that mission.”

Schools participating in the project include Edgeley, Enderlin, Ellendale, Kensal, LaMoure, Lidgerwood and McClusky. Additionally, GPSEC has worked with other institutions within the NDUS, including North Dakota State College of Science and North Dakota State University. Mayville State University and University of North Dakota have also been awarded MSP grants.

Media Coverage Summary – Jan. 22, 2016

Media Coverage Summary Colleges

The following is a roundup of news on North Dakota University System’s 11 public colleges and universities for the week ending Friday, Jan. 22.

 


Bismarck State College

Spring Musical Auditions
BSC hosts high school art reception Jan. 21
‘Know Your State’ contest registration due Feb. 8
BSC’s Michael Langer performs with Missouri Valley Chamber Orchestra
BSC announces President’s Honor Roll for Fall 2015
Energy Generation Conference set for Jan. 26-28
Suspect in Custody from BSC Incident
 


Dakota College at Bottineau

Campus Successes – DCB
 

Dickinson State University
Reclamation Workshop Set for Feb. 22-23
Valdes selected as a volunteer for NCLEX panel
Valentine’s Day Crafts to Raise Funds for Arts Scholarships at DSU
 


Lake Region State College

Ag Career Fair at Precision Ag Center
 

Mayville State University
Million-dollar gift is changing lives
The MSU Golf Classic … respecting the past, while keeping an eye on the future
Comets spread smiles at Sanford Children’s Hospital
“A Sparkling Affair” will benefit MSU and its students
Public invited to learn more about RN to BSN online nursing program at Jan. 14 open house
Travel to Norway with your Mayville State friends!
 

Minot State University
Linda Olson traces history of Chinese ceramics
Minot State announces two Bakken U scholarship awardees
History professors receive grant to preserve Minot’s common heritage
MSU students awarded by Bakken U
“Cowboy Bob” was an expert with a whip
Lecture traces history of Chinese ceramics
Works ‘on and of’ paper’: Exhibit opens at Northwest Art Center
 

North Dakota State College of Science
NDSCS Students Heinz and Mastel nominated for ND Community College Academic All-State Team
 

North Dakota State University
NDSU grad student named to Forbes 30 Under 30 List for Manufacturing and Industry
North Dakota State breaks record with 5th straight FCS national title
Tweet indicates ‘College GameDay’ will return to Fargo
HerVoice: NDSU researcher uses spider silk proteins in biomedical research
NDSU barley variety added to American Malting Barley Association list
NDSU sociologist receives National Endowment of the Humanities grant
Researcher, students study cell death in search for cancer cure
 

University of North Dakota
Unity in action
Beaming with Pride
University of North Dakota alum Edward T. Schafer starts as Interim President of UND Today
UND Art Collections: American Indian Leaders in Higher Education
UND searching for dean of the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences
Children & Family Services Training Center Renews Contract with Department of Human Services
Social Work Student Receives Air Force Association Joan Orr Award Spouse of the Year
New Online BSSW Program Launched this Fall
 

Valley City State University
VCSU online programs nationally ranked by U.S. News
Donors Central to University
 

Williston State College
Dean and President’s List Released for Fall 2015
College Collaboration with STAR Fund and Williston ARC Creates Bubble Ball League
Faces Behind the Funds: Chelsea Shelton
 

North Dakota University System
NDUS awards inaugural Bakken U scholarship
Committee narrows list of candidates for the UND presidential search

Grant expands distance education

BrooksLarry

Larry Brooks, assistant professor of biology and associate dean for academic affairs at Dakota College at Bottineau.

Larry Brooks has been successfully teaching through the interactive video network for 20 years. A new grant will help upgrade the IVN system, deliver courses to students who would normally not have access to them, bring in more revenue and increase collaboration among campuses.

The assistant professor of biology and associate dean for academic affairs at Dakota College at Bottineau has been teaching through IVN since it started being used as a delivery method two decades ago. He’s taught numerous courses, including Anatomy and Physiology I and II, Human Structure and Function, and Water Resource Management. Now, the grant awards totaling more than $505,000 will help to expand on those course deliveries.

Brooks said that the upgrade as applied at his college was most welcome – that although some students might feel a bit anxious at first about the nontraditional course delivery method, they adapted very well to the IVN was of classroom instruction.

“I highly recommend instructors visit the distant sites during the first two-three weeks of each term to help strengthen the student-instructor relationship,” he said, adding that further site visits were always encouraged.

For Brooks the classrooms stay fairly manageable even at a distance. Average overall was around 10 at two distant sites. For his classes it ranged from 10-13 at five or six sites, in addition to 15-20 on-campus students. The greatest benefits to teaching through IVN, from Brooks’ perspective, was that it allowed campuses to deliver courses to students who would otherwise not have access to them – such as students from rural settings.

“The IVN system has been invaluable for DCB to increase its dual credit capacity and to provide instruction to distant sites in Minot and Valley City where DCB offers multiple programs,” he said. “The IVN system allows campuses to expand course offerings while increasing efficient use of faculty resources. Offering classes via IVN increases students headcount which leads to increased tuition collection and enhanced program and campus viability.”

Brooks added that because of IVN-delivered courses, DCB was able to collaborate with other campuses on some programs and classes.

“For example, the Dakota Nursing Program is a consortium of four state colleges (Bismarck State College, DCB, Lake Region State College and Williston State College) who use the IVN system to deliver shared didactic courses and to conduct faculty and administrative meetings,” Brooks said. “The Northern Information Technology Consortium is a consortium of three state colleges (DCB, LRSC and WSC), one tribal college (Turtle Mountain Community College), and one four-year regional university (VCSU) who use the IVN system to cross-list and share IT courses. The IVN system allows both consortia to maximize efficiency and effectiveness through the use of shared resources via the IVN.”

Collaboration is vital as it can lead to the expanding of knowledge bases and the sharing of services. But, the implementation of IVN is focused first on providing distance education. Many students have been able to take courses they’d otherwise have missed out on. One DCB student, Megan Saville, is taking full advantage of those courses.

Saville is now in her last semester at DCB, where she’s finishing her associates degree in Elementary Education. Saville has had a handful of education courses through IVN. For the most part she was happy with her experience.

“I benefitted by having students from other sites input in conversation and discussion,” she said.

Betty Tykwinski, the site manager/nursing instructor for DCB at VCSU, said IVN had been integral to the nursing program’s success. She considered herself to be a novice to the process of teaching through IVN, having just started this year after teaching in traditional classrooms since 2011. Each college involved in the Dakota Nursing Program consortium (BSC, DCB, LRSC and WSC) has distant sites, as well as clinical and lab instructors. Tykwinski serves as a didactic instructor for the VCSU site and teaches through IVN to all the sites – reaching a total of 98 Practical Nursing students and 89 Associate Degree Registered Nursing students.

“All of the theory courses for the Dakota Nursing Program are delivered over the IVN system, so when I teach my class I only have my Valley City students in front of me,” she said. “They attend the afternoon lecture, so when I teach in the morning I have no students in the classroom with me, just those over IVN.”

She felt the benefit to an IVN-delivered class, which could have as many as 50 students enrolled, was in how the offering extended the reach of the program.

“The program is very unique and has allowed many students to become nurses in a nontraditional way – the majority of our students have families, jobs and other responsibilities that would prevent them from attending the traditional nursing program, especially those in the smaller rural areas such as Hazen and Harvey, even here in Valley City,” she said. “The IVN system allows the program to pool faculty resources from each of the sites to deliver a high quality program.”

According to Jerry Rostad, assistant CIO of Core Technology Services, that funding will go toward upgrading 35 Interactive Video Network classrooms through eight institutions. The grant money comes through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utility Service program.

“This grant [program] has been around for some time and we knew the value it provided,” Rostad said. “Concurrently, a lot of our IVN equipment was nearing end of life, and so we figured the USDA would support the continued operation of our successful video network.”

The IVN classrooms can be set up in about a day; classes or events such as meetings can be scheduled for any time in the future. The institutions of Dakota College at Bottineau, Dickinson State University, Lake Region State College, Mayville State University, North Dakota State College of Science, North Dakota State University, Valley City State University and Williston State College will all receive upgrades. Rostad said the other four institutions – located in Bismarck, Fargo, Grand Forks and Minot – did not meet the rural requirements of the grant.

Candidates narrowed for the UND presidential search

[UPDATED 2/5/2016 1:35 P.M.]

Committee narrows list of presidential candidates to interview on UND campus

The University of North Dakota presidential search committee interviewed presidential candidates Feb. 1 and 2 in-person in Minneapolis to narrow the list of 16 candidates to seven.

“I was highly impressed with the level of experience that these individuals brought to our search and the specific qualifications each one has to meet the needs of our students and build our campus legacy into the future,” UND Presidential Search Committee Co-Chair Hesham El-Rewini said. “We look forward to each candidate visiting our university to meet our faculty, staff, students and community members. These visits will be essential in showcasing our beautiful campus and engaging our various constituents in the process.”

“We are pleased with the wealth of experience embodied by the candidates of this presidential search,” UND Presidential Search Committee Co-Chair Grant Shaft said. “As we progress through the next phase of this search we are confident that we will discover who will be the best fit to serve the campus and community.”

The semi-finalists will be invited to campus between the dates of Feb. 11 through March 3 to meet with the search committee as well as meet with a broad base of internal and external constituency groups. The search committee will solicit feedback from faculty, staff, students and all other constituencies before the final meeting of the search committee scheduled for March 7.

The finalists who will proceed to the next interview stage include:
• Dr. Mark Rudin, vice president for research and economic development at Boise State University, Idaho
• Dr. Jay Noren, associate dean, College of Medicine at University of Illinois in Chicago and former president at Wayne State University
• Hon. Mark R. Kennedy, director of Graduate School of Political Management at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.; and former congressman (2001-07)
• Dr. Nagi G. Naganathan, dean, College of Engineering and Interim President (2014-15) at University of Toledo, Ohio
• Dr. Daniel L. Clay, Dean, College of Education at University of Missouri, Missouri
• Dr. Morgan R. Olsen, executive vice president, treasurer and chief financial officer at Arizona State University, Arizona
• Dr. Steven Shirley, president of Minot State University, Minot, N.D.

The search committee will recommend a slate of finalists to the State Board of Higher Education, which will conduct final interviews on the UND campus March 15, with the selection of the next UND president announced thereafter.


Committee adds application to list of candidates for UND presidential search

The University of North Dakota presidential search committee met via phone conference today to decide if two recent applicants would be included in the upcoming in-person interviews to be held next week in Minneapolis. The committee made the decision to accept applications before the deadline of noon on Wednesday, Jan. 27.

The committee voted unanimously to include current Minot State University President Steve Shirley in the interviews. It also decided not to advance the second applicant, Dr. Cynthia Lindquist, the current president of Cankdeska Cikana Community College in Fort Totten.

“Our goal as a committee is to find the best leader for UND and where we want to be in the future as an institution,” UND presidential search committee co-chair Hesham El-Rewini said. “We have a great pool of applicants and from here, we will be able to interview everyone in person and see how their skills fit with the goals of UND.”

The committee will interview the candidates Feb. 1 and 2 when they will meet in person in Minneapolis. The other candidates who will proceed were voted upon at a previous meeting. The names of those advancing can be foundhere.

Following the next phase of interviews, the semi-finalists will be invited to UND’s campus between Feb. 11 and March 3 to meet with the search committee, as well as meet with a broad-base of internal and external constituency groups. The search committee will solicit feedback from faculty, staff, students and all other constituencies before the final meeting scheduled for March 7. The search committee will recommend a slate of finalists to the State Board of Higher Education, which will meet at the UND campus March 15 to make its decision.


Committee narrows list of candidates for the UND presidential search

The University of North Dakota presidential search committee met in Grand Forks today to narrow the list of 41 candidates to 15.

“Our committee had the opportunity to see a group of highly qualified applicants and spent quality time discussing each of their resumes and letters to see who is the best fit for the future of our university,” UND Presidential Search Committee Co-Chair Hesham El-Rewini said. “AGB Search consultants are impressed with the strong interest in UND from across the country. It is an important and an exciting time for the campus and community.”

The committee’s next step will be to interview the candidates Feb. 1 and 2 when they will meet the candidates in person in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

“I think that going forward, we have narrowed our list of candidates to match UND’s needs as the campus moves into the future. I think the results of today were very positive with great dialogue that will continue into each stage. The decision of who should lead this institution is a great responsibility and I thank all of those who are giving all of their efforts as well as volunteering their time to this very worthy endeavor,” UND Presidential Search Committee Co-Chair Grant Shaft said.

The finalists who will proceed to the interview stage include:

 

  • Mark Rudin, vice president for research and economic development at Boise State University, Idaho
  • Robert C. Beatty, dean at College of Business at Florida Gulf Coast University, Florida
    Dr. Rodney S. Hanley, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Fisk University, Tennessee
  • Kody Varahramyan, senior aide to the chancellor; former vice chancellor for research (2008-15) at Indiana University – Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI), Indiana
  • Robert A. Kennedy, executive search consultant at Academic Keys, Minnesota and former President (2011-2012) for Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education
  • Ronald L. Elsenbaumer, senior advisor to the president; former provost and vice president for academic affairs (2011-15) at University of Texas in Arlington, Texas
  • Jay Noren, associate dean, College of Medicine at University of Illinois in Chicago and former president at Wayne State University
  • Helena S. Wisniewski, vice provost for research and graduate studies; dean of the Graduate School at University of Alaska Anchorage, Alaska
  • Ray M. Purpur, deputy director of athletics, physical education and recreation at Stanford University, California
  • Mark R. Kennedy, director of Graduate School of Political Management at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.; and former congressman (2001-07)
  • Nagi G. Naganathan, dean, College of Engineering and Interim President (2014-15) at University of Toledo, Ohio
  • Daniel L. Clay, Dean, College of Education at University of Missouri, Missouri
  • Timothy J. Greene, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Western Michigan University, Michigan
  • Allen Lee Sessoms, distinguished professor, School of Continuing Studies at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., and former president (2008-13) at University System of the District of Columbia
  • Morgan R. Olsen, executive vice president, treasurer and chief financial officer at Arizona State University, Arizona

 

Following the next phase of interviews, the semi-finalists will be invited to campus between the dates of Feb. 11 through March 3 to meet with the search committee as well as meet with a broad base of internal and external constituency groups. The search committee will solicit feedback from faculty, staff, students and all other constituencies before the final meeting of the search committee scheduled for March 7. The search committee will recommend a slate of finalists to the State Board of Higher Education, which will conduct final interviews on the UND campus March 15, with the selection of the next UND president announced thereafter.

University of North Dakota alum Edward T. Schafer started as Interim President of UND Friday, Jan. 15

Ed and Nancy Schafer. Photo by Jackie Lorentz.

Ed and Nancy Schafer. Photo by Jackie Lorentz.

Edward T. Schafer, former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture under George W. Bush and former North Dakota Governor, officially starts as the Interim President of the University of North Dakota Today, Friday, Jan. 15. A UND alum, Schafer follows Dr. Robert Kelley, who started as UND’s 11th president in July 2008 and who retired Thursday, Jan. 14.

Born and raised in Bismarck, N.D., Schafer graduated from the UND in 1969 with a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and earned an MBA from the University of Denver in 1970. UND awarded Schafer an honorary Doctor of Letters in 2008, and the UND Alumni Association & Foundation awarded him the Sioux Award in 2009.

Schafer was sworn in as the 29th Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on Jan. 28, 2008. As Secretary of Agriculture, he oversaw a $95 billion operating budget and over 107,000 employees. He restructured and reshaped 29 agencies to modernize the focus of $285 billion in program delivery and built a new process for implementing the 2008 Farm Bill. He also initiated the Secretary’s Fight Hunger Initiative, directed the United States’ response to the World Food Crisis, and helped direct international trade negotiations on behalf of the federal government.

Schafer served as North Dakota’s governor from 1992 to 2000, making education the number one priority of his administration, during which time his administration was able to increase spending by reshaping the budget to reflect spending priorities. He also started the Education Roundtable, which led to the modernization of the system in North Dakota, and he co-founded the Western Governors University. Other administration priorities included diversification and strengthening of the economy and reducing the cost of government. He also led efforts to upgrade North Dakota’s communications infrastructure and make high-speed voice and data networks across the state.

As governor, Schafer oversaw a budget of $4.6 billion, and led the state’s response to emergencies such as the severe flood that hit Grand Forks and the northern Red River Valley in 1997. Schafer, who visited Grand Forks and the University of North Dakota at the most critical point in the flood disaster, was instrumental in marshaling and mobilizing North Dakota resources, including the manpower of the North Dakota National Guard, to help the Grand Forks area, including UND, manage the flood and its aftermath.

Schafer chaired the Western Governors Association, leading efforts to demonstrate how technology could improve the efficiency and lower the cost of delivering government services, and he was elected chair of the Republican Governors Association in 2000, co-founding and co-chairing the Governors Biotechnology Partnership to increase public understanding and support for the benefits of agricultural biotechnology.

Before entering public life, Schafer was an executive with the Gold Seal Company in Bismarck, a successful marketer of nationally-known consumer products such as “Mr. Bubble” bubble bath, “Glass Wax” glass cleaner and “Snowy Bleach.” The company had been founded by his father, Harold Schafer. Ed Schafer joined Gold Seal after he earned his MBA and held a series of management positions with the company before becoming president in 1978. Under his leadership, Gold Seal’s sales doubled and the net worth of the company tripled. It was sold in 1986. Schafer then went on to launch several new businesses, including a commercial real estate development company, a fish farm and a classic car dealership.

After leaving office in 2000, he co-founded Extend America, a venture capital-backed company, to provide wireless voice and high-speed data services to commercial and residential customers in five rural Midwestern states. He also continues to serve as the chairman of the Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foundation that oversees the operations of the historic town his father resurrected, and he became active in leading several other nonprofit and citizens advocacy groups in North Dakota.

Schafer and his wife, Nancy, have four children; Tom Schafer, Ellie Schafer and Eric Jones and Kari Hammer; and 13 grandchildren.

Robert Kelley: a research legacy

by Juan Miguel Pedraza, University & Public Affairs writer

 

UND President Robert Kelley interacts with students in Biology Professor Susan Felege's lab. Kelley, who is retiring this week, is leaving a significant teaching and research legacy at UND. Photo by Shawna Schill.

UND President Robert Kelley interacts with students in Biology Professor Susan Felege’s lab. Kelley, who is retiring this week, is leaving a significant teaching and research legacy at UND. Photo by Shawna Schill.

UND’s 11th president – a career scientist – has overseen an unprecedented period of growth in creative activity and administrative support for new innovations on the UND campus and beyond.

Bob Kelley caught bug fever when he was just a child.

“During a family vacation, a park ranger at Yellowstone National Park showed me little insects called antlions, whose larvae (often called doodlebugs) build traps in sandy soil,” said Kelley, whose name now is followed with Ph.D., and the title of President, University of North Dakota.

“I watched closely as an ant fell into one of those traps and was devoured by the antlion-I was fascinated,” Kelley said.

Kelley’s close encounter with the antlion and its prey sparked his lifelong sense of inquiry.

“‘How in the world did that happen?’ I remember asking myself,” said Kelley, who began his tenure as UND’s 11th president July 1, 2008. “I wondered how the insect learned to build that trap. More importantly, as I pondered it, how was that information transmitted from one generation to the next of these insects? I became very curious about it.”

That curiosity followed him to college, where he spent a semester breeding Drosophila melanogaster-fruit flies-for a biology professor. Kelley, among other tasks, had to selectively breed flies with no eye pigment-in a species normally endowed with brightly hued eyes-for the final exam the professor was preparing for his class.

“That turned out to be a seminal experience for me,” said Kelley, under whose tenure the regional economic impact of research at UND has grown to about $193 million, from around $100 million when he started.

Fostering inquiry

Kelley’s research legacy at UND includes managing tough times following the end of congressional earmarks in 2011 and pared-down research budgets among the country’s top federal funding agencies.

Today, Kelley, a working scientist for the better part of 50 years in academia, is still curious about the world, and that includes fostering the work of young researchers and scholars going with promising lines of inquiry.

His scientific curiosity has driven his encouragement of UND’s research enterprise, which has nearly doubled since he took his seat in Twamley Hall.

“I ask questions like ‘how does it work, what are the mechanisms of natural processes, how do animals develop,'” he said. “That ultimately led me into graduate school where I studied cellular differentiation,” as part of his Ph.D. program at the University of California-Berkeley, in zoology: cell and developmental biology.

Kelley said curiosity-and a passion to dig up answers-is behind every effective research and scholarship project.

“It’s that kind of fundamental curiosity that drives all researchers and scholars, whether you’re curious about history, what really happened three centuries ago, whether you’re a researcher in the performing arts trying to find new and innovative ways to express movements of the human body, or whether you’re digging into the mysteries of epigenetics,” said Kelley. “That’s one of the most fascinating elements of university life. And one of the things that’s driven me over the years.”

UND President Robert O. Kelley Discusses his Research Legacy from University of North Dakota on Vimeo.

Collaboration is key

Kelley’s photograph hangs in the anatomy division’s display case in the Department of Basic Sciences at the School of Medicine & Health Sciences-that’s Kelley’s academic “home.”

“I exchanged notes and conversations when I was a working scientist with people like UND Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Anatomy Ed Carlson (who spent 40 years teaching and researching here, including 30 years as chair of the former Department of Anatomy),” said Kelley, who, until he took over as president at UND, was director of the Center for Rural Health Research and Education at the University of Wyoming, among other research leadership roles.

“That kind of collegiality underscores why our research enterprise is so successful here,” said Kelley. “Scholars and scientists get to know people all over the world, to exchange ideas, to collaborate, to gather to discuss theories, hypotheses — the results of your experiments.”

Kelley says today’s research is all about collaboration.

“Questions that have impact, whether in the physical sciences, life sciences, or in the humanities, are often so broad, so complicated, that they require so many different approaches,” said Kelley. “You’ve got to have colleagues, you’ve got to be able to come together around these complex issues that impact all of us.”

Kelley described research through an anecdote recounted by a carpenter he knows.

“He told me that he likes working with people because carpentry presented issues where it was beneficial to have more than one head to scratch,” Kelley said. “Science, the humanities-all scholarship, all research is much the same way-these days it’s hard to do it by yourself.”

Broader impacts

He’s the boss and it’s been his responsibility to lead the University’s research enterprise growth since he got here in 2008. But Kelley shrinks from taking much credit.

“In my position, you have to start out by saying ‘thank you’ to an awful lot of good, very bright, very hard working people who are clearly very committed to advancing their disciplines and advancing UND, in research and scholarly effort,” Kelley said.

“So we’ve had many bright people on our campus to enhance the research enterprise,” he continued. “The growth in research here hasn’t just been accomplished administratively-the real work is done in laboratories, classrooms and other kinds of venues where people come together to explore ideas and reach some kind of outcome in that exploration.”

The main thing about Kelley’s research legacy is a forward-looking perspective at broader impacts.

“UND’s research enterprise has adapted to the needs of the state very closely,” said Kelley.

“For example, all of us in North Dakota are concerned about our health, and about the physiology and the fundamental biomedicine behind health, and we have advanced this through laboratory development in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences,” Kelley said. “The state recognized that by funding the new medical school building. That huge state investment of $125 million will help to advance biomedical education and research and all of the activities of delivering care in our state.”

Filling the toolbox

Biomedical research has reached record funding this year-again, in a tough competitive environment nationally-with three major grants totally more than $30 million. Those developmental grants, roughly $10 million each, was for an epigenetics COBRE (Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence), a neuroscience COBRE, and for INBRE (IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence), an education and research program that manages funding for researchers around the state, including the tribal colleges.

“Those go into providing the infrastructure that we’ve been talking about,” Kelley said. “That’s about building the toolbox, building the equipment, instrumentation that we need, helping us hire the best and brightest faculty, giving them start-up monies, so that they have some ‘venture capital,’ if you will, to test out their ideas.”

Fueling energy research

A second research growth area: Kelley points to the significant expansion of energy research.

“It’s not just oil and gas-though that’s a big part of it, but we’ve also looked at wind, geothermal, solar initiatives; we’ve created an Institute for Energy Studies,” Kelley said. “We’re also building a new Collaborative Energy Complex, where people can come together to explore the ideas around energy broadly stated. We’re going to see great results over the coming years,” Kelley said.

“The Energy & Environmental Research Center, a very strong and applied engineering laboratory, is looking at very practical solutions to the problems facing the energy industry into the more basic fundamental sciences that are being developed around energy in the College of Engineering & Mines,” Kelley said.

Unmanned revolution

A third area that has taken off in the last several years under Kelley’s watch is Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), including the establishment of a Center of Excellence for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Research, Education and Training, based at the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences.

“Actually, we’re using unmanned systems for a variety of robotic applications, not only those things that fly, but also things that work on the surface of the Earth, even some that go underneath the Earth and in water,” Kelley said.

“We’ve got new construction going on, new laboratories, thanks to (benefactors Si Robin and Mary E. Bazar), over at UND Aerospace (with the addition of Robin Hall),” Kelley said.

All this is in addition to the UAS Center of Excellence at the Grand Forks International Airport and a new training facility at the Grand Forks Air Force Base.

“They present huge opportunities for both basic and applied research activities relative to all of the technologies that go behind a UAS or other remotely operated vehicles,” Kelley said.

Interdisciplinary strengths

Kelley said there’s growth in many other areas besides the “big three” of biomedicine, energy, and aerospace thanks to a spirit of interdisciplinary collaborations in Arts & Sciences.

“We’re seeing real burgeoning in the digital humanities, including the UND Working Group in Digital & New Media which is trying to connect areas of library resources with the Philosophy Department, even across into the Music Department in the College of Arts & Sciences,” Kelley said. “They’re looking to create new educational paradigms in the digital humanities using technology to advance these areas.”

“We’re also seeing a lot of new research coming out of our Chemistry Department in collaboration with Chemical Engineering in biofuel development,” Kelley said. “It’s beyond ethanol — UND researchers are looking at what other forms of biomass and what other forms of fuel you can develop from that biomass. This is a rapidly growing area.”

Amplifying human intellect

Kelley’s long experience as a bioscientist doing bench research and managing research establishments has taught him a lot about complexity and the need for high performance computing (HPC) to engage in deeper investigations.

“That’s the thing about the biological sciences: complexity,” said Kelley. “We’ve understood since about 1953 the nature of the double helix, we’ve understood how genes now fit into chromosomes, but what the genome produces-how it works–creates stunning complexity.”

Today’s scientists-tackling complex questions and deluge of data the answers generate-can’t do much without HPC.

“Any scientist, any creative person, wants to crunch more numbers faster, wants to ask more questions, and get outcomes and answers more quickly,” Kelley said. “HPC amplifies the human intellect. That’s why we’re privileged that the state of North Dakota set up the High Performance Computing Center, located on west end of our campus-it gives researchers here and elsewhere in the system access to the computing power that’s essential to any effective research enterprise.”

To grow the research enterprise at UND,” Kelley says, the institutions must focus strengthening fundamental resources: facilities, equipment, laboratories, appropriate classrooms and technologies.

But Kelley also stressed, “The most important resource is the human mind,” he said. “So, we obviously must recruit the best, the brightest and we’re already doing that. And we’ve got more faculty coming in who are better prepared, more productive, and we’re going to see that growth across our campus.”

It is, Kelley noted, an exciting time to be a part of UND’s research and scholarly activities.

NDUS awards inaugural Bakken U scholarship

Bakken U Director Jerry Rostad (left) and Dickinson State University President Thomas Mitzel (right) present the inaugural Bakken U scholarship of $5,000 to Warren Logan, a former oilfield worker now enrolled at DSU. Logan plans to pursue a degree in business at the university.

Bakken U Director Jerry Rostad (left) and Dickinson State University President Thomas Mitzel (right) present the inaugural Bakken U scholarship of $5,000 to Warren Logan, a former oilfield worker now enrolled at DSU. Logan plans to pursue a degree in business at the university.

The first of its kind scholarship was awarded under North Dakota University System’s Bakken U initiative today to a Dickinson State University student.

Warren Logan, an oilfield worker planning to enroll in courses at DSU, was awarded the $5,000 scholarship, funded by the N.D. Petroleum Council, during a press conference today at the DSU Student Center ballroom. Jerry Rostad, director of the Bakken U initiative, said that Logan exemplified the characteristics of students the program aimed to reward.

“Mr. Logan has spent considerable time working hard in the Bakken oilfield, and now has chosen to come back to school at Dickinson State University,” Rostad said. “If he is able to apply the work ethic and drive to his classes that he applied to his oilfield work, he will be a success.”

Rostad was part of the committee that reviewed approximately 40 applicants for the first scholarship. He said that he was impressed with the pool of applicants and Logan’s story stood out because of his commitment to advancing himself in his established community.

“The most important thing I’ve learned through my time in the oilfield is that hard work will take you far, but in order to qualify for advancement opportunities, a degree is a requirement. I fully expect to achieve a degree in business administration and continue to work in the area,” Logan said. “Dickinson has given me so much since my wife and I relocated that leaving from an unexpected loss of employment is not an option. Dickinson is where we have chosen to make our home. With a degree and a surplus of non-oilfield work, I know we would be able to continue in the community we have come to love.”

Melanie Tucker, vice president for student affairs and enrollment management at DSU said that the energy industry in an important component of the region’s economy. “DSU’s mission is to serve the residents of the region by offering high quality, accessible programs. The services offered through DSU for the Bakken U initiative allow those who are impacted by the volatility of the energy industry to secure for themselves an education that will stand firm through time.”

Future scholarships will be made available through Bakken U. Details on the scholarships will be forthcoming.

Media Coverage Summary – Friday, Jan. 8

Media Coverage Summary Colleges

The following is a roundup of news on North Dakota University System’s 11 public colleges and universities for the week ending Friday, Jan. 8.

 


Bismarck State College

BSC receives top score in military journal
BSC’s continuing education division wins award
BSC employees honored for years of service
Blizzard Bluegrass concert set for Jan. 15-16
 


Dakota College at Bottineau

Hewson happy with first season at Dakota College
 

Dickinson State University
Future educators engage in collaborative learning opportunities
DSU receives grant for distance education technology
 


Lake Region State College

TrainND Northeast Offers 5-part Ag Commodity Series
 

Mayville State University
Tribute to Dr. Ray Gerszewski
Madrigal Feast at Mayville State
Stewardship opportunities available
Opportunities to gather with MSU friends
Discounts offered for donations to food pantry
 

Minot State University
Registration underway at MSU
Minot attorney seeks district judgeship
Not forgotten: WWII veterans keep history alive
Did You Know That” Famed LSU coach a North Dakota success story
Stanley man is North Dakota poker champion, wins $50,000
Poker weekend
North Dakota poker champion being crowned in Minot this week
Texas Hold “Em Tournament Begins Wednesday in Minot
Professors and Adviser of the Year selected at MSU
Students Present Local History Research
Sign Language Students Learn National Anthems
Music of the season 1 & 2
Can’t read my poker face
 

North Dakota State College of Science
East Grand Forks college is designing a program to equip refugees with work skills
Alumni foundation receives major gifts
 

North Dakota State University
NCAA Football Championship: NDSU, JSU team up for kids flag football game
Family central to LeCompte getting a leg up at North Dakota State
NDSU Extension agent uses science, rabbits to connect kids with 4-H
NDSU student helps grandfather recover Vietnam war medal
NDSU researcher studies why older parents’ offspring have reduced longevity
NDSU safety service app showcased at higher ed conference
Frisco to host NCAA Division I ChampionshipNDSU Extension agronomists seek soybean production data
Getting the best return on the money you spend for fertilizer
US Farm Report TV host, corn/soybean producer to speak at DDD
New instructor at LRSC Dakota Precision Ag
University Distinguished Professors recognized for research impact
 

University of North Dakota
In pursuit of impactful research
UND’s College of Engineering & Mines forms partnership with a Texas university
Day of remembrance
UND Chester Fritz Library Staff Donates More Than $300 Worth of Books to Grand Forks Head Start
40 UNDer 40
OLLI Featured Instructor: Drew Combs
Alumni Spotlight Wayne Dewald,’73
2015 Inductee in the UND Department of Accountancy Hall of Fame
 

Valley City State University
Fall semester 2015 President’s and Dean’s Honor Rolls released
 

Williston State College
Faces Behind the Funds: Alaury Liesener
Faces Behind the Funds: Shanda Harstad
 

North Dakota University System
IVN Usage remains strong