UND named one of the top 10 best online graduate business programs for veterans

June 24, 2014

UND breaks ground for new School of Medicine and Health Sciences building

The University of North Dakota broke ground for the new $122 million School of Medicine and Health Sciences building June 12.  The 325,000-gross-square-foot facility will incorporate, for the first time under one roof, all of the School’s departments, some of which have had to be housed in separate locations on the Grand Forks campus for lack of space at the current SMHS headquarters.  Taking part in the groundbreaking with UND President Robert Kelley and UND Vice President for Health Sciences and Dean of the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences Joshua Wynne were North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple, Sen. Ray Holmberg, Sen. Robert Erbele, Sen. Judy Lee, Mayor Michael Brown, and CEO of Altru Health Systems and Chair of the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences Advisory Committee Dave Molmen.

 

UND named one of the top 10 best online graduate business programs for veterans

The University of North Dakota online Master of Business Administration (MBA) program was recently ranked #9 by U.S. News & World Report in its 2014 Best Online Programs for Veterans.  According to usnews.com, rankings are determined by affordability, accessibility, and reputation.  Other ranking criteria included institution certification for the G.I. Bill and membership in the Service members Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium.  Earlier this year, U.S. News & World Report ranked UND’s College of Business & Public Administration in its top 50 online programs.

 

UND rocket  successfully flown in Utah, garners national attention

Frozen Fury, University of North Dakota’s rocket team, recently produced a successful flight in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Student Launch 2014, a NASA-sponsored national rocketry competition in Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah.  This year, NASA increased the research requirements related to the payload aboard competition rockets in addition to the usual four in-depth reports and presentations that it requires.  UND competed against 31 other universities across the nation for the chance to go to Utah and launch its rocket. As part of the competition, NASA had given the universities a specific deadline to launch their rockets and submit a full analyses of the results.  UND’s rocket soared 5,433 feet and came down with its two parachutes intact. And Frozen Fury’s on-board experiment successfully collected video footage of liquid movement in microgravity.